Watershed and Drainage Management Plans

Watershed and Drainage Management Plans

A watershed is an area of land bounded by physical barriers that catch rain and snow, that ultimately drains or seeps to a particular marsh, arroyo, stream, river, lake or groundwater recharge area. Watersheds do not respect political boundaries – they only follow the constraints of topography. Whatever happens at the highest point of a watershed soon shows up at the lowest.

  • Motor oil and other contaminants washed off paved surfaces (or poured) into storm drains can affect drinking water
  • Fertilizers, animal droppings and pesticides all wash down to the river or arroyo when it rains
  • Sediments can plug drainage facilities and cause them to overflow
  • Grass clippings and other organic waste rob water of important oxygen needed for life

Watershed management plans prepared by agencies like SSCAFCA provide opportunities for communities to address water quality, control and conservation issues within the physical boundaries of a watershed. They offer the opportunity to develop an inclusive approach to support flood protection, quality of life issues and environmentally sustainable development – using the watershed as a holistic planning framework.

SSCAFCA’s boundaries encompass twelve distinct watersheds:

  • Black Arroyo
  • Calabacillas Arroyo
  • Corrales East
  • Corrales West
  • Montoyas Arroyo
  • Lomitas Negras
  • La Barranca
  • NM 528 Channel

Our plans for managing watersheds define a process for maintaining, protecting and restoring the natural resources within each watershed while also enhancing the quality of life in the included communities. Each identifies and prioritizes necessary improvements to the watershed in order to provide flood protection up to the 100-year storm within that watershed; to reduce sediment, water pollution and erosion; and to actualize the multi-use potential of land purchased or controlled for floodways. Comprehensive plans for flood control and watershed protection have been drawn up for the watersheds of the Black, Montoyas, Venada and La Barranca Arroyos, as well as for the Unnamed Arroyo.

Watershed  and Drainage Management Plans

Comprehensive Management Strategy for Arroyo Corridors (13 MB)